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TrishaTrishaJun 25, 2016

Rape isn't a women's issue. It is a human issue.

Rape culture is a term in which originated in women's studies and feminist theory, describing a culture in which rape and sexual violence against women are common and in which prevalent attitudes, norms, practices, and media condone, normalize, excuse, or tolerate sexual violence against women. Examples of behaviors with rape culture include victim blaming, sexual objectification, and rape apologists.

If we believe in "rape culture" that targets women, you're being abused by people who want to scare you in order to line their pockets. Like I said before in a previous post, people in fear consume more. Don't fall for it and stop letting the men in your life be abused by this lie.

No one ever discusses adult male victims. In jail, more men are raped every year than women in the general population. But no one cares about that, because they're just criminals, right?

Male predators go to jail; female predators go to counseling.

In reality, men have far more reason to fear women in our culture than women have to fear men. When a women is proven to have made false rape or abuse allegations, our culture is quick to make excuses and protect her. What about the man whose life she destroyed with her lies?

When it comes to gender equality in our culture, we live on a one-way street paved with double standards.
In the last few years there has been an unfortunate trend toward blaming 'rape culture' for the extensive problem of sexual violence on campuses.

Young men on college campuses who are accused of sexual assault have lost the right to due process and legal representation. Men are physically bigger and stronger than the average women, but physical strength and body size have nothing to do with abuse.

If we live in a rape culture, it's one in which violence against men and boys is normalized and excused, and not the other way around. The Violence Against Women Act protects female victims of domestic violence, but not male victims. "Don't hit girls." Where is the equivalent message for girls about hitting boys?

Male victims of sexual abuse are treated as secondary. The FBI didn't even consider men as victims in their definition of rape until 2012. The previous definition was, "the carnal knowledge of female, forcibly and against her will."

"Made to penetrate" cases are all the more complicated because of a mans lack of autonomy over his penis.

It's astounding how many awful things that occur in this world because men are afraid of appearing weak.

The dismissive attitude regarding male rape isn't only objectionable, it's also extremely harmful because it leads to the unjustified narrative that men can't be raped. Rape is not caused by cultural factors but the conscious decisions, of a small percentage of the community, to commit a violent crime.

As a society it's time to accept the fact that both men and women are equally capable of hurting each other. I don't live in fear of men. I live in fear of violent criminals and pathological liars of both sexes.

Trisha Metty is a law student in Minnesota.

Her Twitter: @trishmetty

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@itsthatguyagain@itsthatguyagainJun 25, 2016227 views
Rape isn't a women's issue. It is a human issue. Rape culture is a term in which originated in women's studies and feminist theory, describing a culture in which rape and sexual violence against women are common and in which prevalent attitudes, norms, practices, and media condone, normalize,

@1420675 Good points for the most part and well done. But easy on the matronizing language like "a man's lack of autonomy over his penis", please, sister. Try and get near mine without my affirmative consent, and you'll find out a whole new meaning for "autonomy", I guarantee you. Go a step further in sympathizing with and showing respect for men and manhood, won't you, and stop assuming you know all there is to know about us? This remark, though probably unintentionally I grant you, smacks of "gender studies culture" in my reading of it, and maybe shows just how deeply that violation has penetrated (pun intended).

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@gnossos@gnossosMar 22, 2017
Rape isn't a women's issue. It is a human issue. Rape culture is a term in which originated in women's studies and feminist theory, describing a culture in which rape and sexual violence against women are common and in which prevalent attitudes, norms, practices, and media condone, normalize,
MAJOR kudos for spreading awareness on this! I came across this while writing a blog post on redefining rape as a human issue rather than a women's issue, just as you've said here.

I'd venture to guess that many people would argue that the majority of rape victims are women, but I feel it is simply because women feel more comfortable talking about it and reporting it.

Browsing a few blogs on topics like rape and sexual assault proves that most people who care enough to write about it tend to be very misinformed and exclusive. Most women who write and spread awareness about rape tend to have a "no boys allowed" attitude that not only excludes men but also demonizes them as predators. Needless to say, this creates quite a hostile environment for non-female victims and undoubtedly keeps them in silence more often.

I'm not saying that female victims shouldn't have a "safe space" for a support system. Oftentimes discussion of rape and sexual assault brings out the worst examples of humanity in the comment threads. I just feel that it is unforgivable that men and individuals all across the gender spectrum are explicitly excluded from most resources for rape/sexual assault victims.
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@gnossos@gnossosMar 22, 2017
Rape isn't a women's issue. It is a human issue. Rape culture is a term in which originated in women's studies and feminist theory, describing a culture in which rape and sexual violence against women are common and in which prevalent attitudes, norms, practices, and media condone, normalize,
I have to admit, I only skimmed your post before my last comment. Now that I've read it in its entirety, I only wish you'd included some references for statements like, "In jail, more men are raped every year than women in the general population." I feel this statement would be hard to prove since the majority of rape cases go unreported outside of jail, however I wouldn't be surprised.
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"No one talks about adult male victims." SO true. My husband was molested as a child by his grandfather. It wasn't until I met him that I really started getting passionate about advocacy for male victims...

I do have to respectfully partially disagree with one thing though. While it is true that there are cases where people are wrongfully accused of rape, I totally disagree that men should be more afraid of women because she could "ruin his life with her lies."

Although false accusations must be acknowledged, keep in mind that 98% of rape cases go nowhere in the court system and only 2/7% that are arrested even go to jail,(http://www.kcsarc.org/). I feel that the term "rape" is in serious need of being redefined, however I feel that the fact that rape is almost statistically legal in the U.S. is probably a bigger issue that needs to be addressed, because it affects us all.
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